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blackhistoryeveryday:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 11, 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop
On this day in 1973, DJ Kool Herc dropped a new sound that changed history. While DJ’ing at his sister’s back-to-school party, Herc tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (scratching the track) to let people dance longer (break dancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. And so DJ Kool Herc set hip-hop on its dynamic evolution towards the expressive art form it is today.
Take an intimate look at the innovation, excitement and collective spirit that characterizes the early beginnings of hip-hop and its influence today.

Our post on hip hop.

blackhistoryeveryday:

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 11, 1973: The Birth of Hip-Hop

On this day in 1973, DJ Kool Herc dropped a new sound that changed history. While DJ’ing at his sister’s back-to-school party, Herc tried something new on the turntable: he extended an instrumental beat (scratching the track) to let people dance longer (break dancing) and began MC’ing (rapping) during the extended breakdancing. And so DJ Kool Herc set hip-hop on its dynamic evolution towards the expressive art form it is today.

Take an intimate look at the innovation, excitement and collective spirit that characterizes the early beginnings of hip-hop and its influence today.

Our post on hip hop.

it's quite gross. a lot of it is things like "boys are told they can't dye their hair!!" or "wear x, x, and x!!" and i firmly believe these gender expectations for boys should be broken down but they completely ignore the fact that these problems are rooted in misogyny. boys are told that these things are feminine and that femininity is bad. it's not misandry, it's misogyny backfiring on the perpetrators.
pbsthisdayinhistory:

February 25, 1870: America’s First Black Senator Is Sworn In
Hiram Rhodes Revels, the country’s first African American member of U.S. Congress, took his seat on this day in 1870, representing the state of Mississippi. Southern Democrats, who were for the most part supporters of segregation, tried to block his nomination.
From the U.S. House of Representatives Archives:

Just before the Senate agreed to admit a black man to its ranks on February 25, Republican Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts sized up the importance of the moment: “All men are created equal, says the great Declaration,” Sumner roared, “and now a great act attests this verity. Today we make the Declaration a reality…. The Declaration was only half established by Independence. The greatest duty remained behind. In assuring the equal rights of all we complete the work.”

Revel’s term lasted little more than a year. Hiram Rhodes Revels impressed many political observers with his oratorical gifts and moderate temperament.Dive deeper into the story behind Revel’s election with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

February 25, 1870: America’s First Black Senator Is Sworn In

Hiram Rhodes Revels, the country’s first African American member of U.S. Congress, took his seat on this day in 1870, representing the state of Mississippi. Southern Democrats, who were for the most part supporters of segregation, tried to block his nomination.

From the U.S. House of Representatives Archives:

Just before the Senate agreed to admit a black man to its ranks on February 25, Republican Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts sized up the importance of the moment: “All men are created equal, says the great Declaration,” Sumner roared, “and now a great act attests this verity. Today we make the Declaration a reality…. The Declaration was only half established by Independence. The greatest duty remained behind. In assuring the equal rights of all we complete the work.”

Revel’s term lasted little more than a year. Hiram Rhodes Revels impressed many political observers with his oratorical gifts and moderate temperament.

Dive deeper into the story behind Revel’s election with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

If you think women are crazy you’ve never had a dude go from hitting on you to literally threatening to kill you in the time it takes you to say “no thanks.”

Kendra Wells (via belle-de-nuit)

Well this is fucking surreal

(via kendrawcandraw)

aos-skimmons:

that-big-gay-impala:

THE SARCASM IN THIS POST IN LETHAL

woman mothers.

aos-skimmons:

that-big-gay-impala:

THE SARCASM IN THIS POST IN LETHAL

woman mothers.

Nothing is wrong with being white. Nothing is wrong with being black. Nothing is wrong with any race. The only thing wrong is hating on another race. :)

thisiseverydayracism:

Unfortunately, unlike unicorns, white people’s historical and present record of limitless brutality towards people of color on all levels from interpersonal to institutional is very real.

So ideally how would you like the world to be? Who'd be in power? If anyone
Anonymous

thisisnotjapan:

You must be white.  Always going back to this assumption that someone/some group MUST have power over others even in an “ideal” world.  Benevolent power holder(s) is an illusion made by those with power so that they can absolve themselves of guilt at the inherent inequality they benefit from.

My wife and I want to adopt a kid because there are already enough kids in the world and a lot that don't have a family. We want to do the most amount of good, and black children are less likely to be adopted, but we're both white. Would it be more detrimental to them grow up with parents who do not have a first hand perspective of their future social experience and risk being ostracized by some for not actually being black, or would it be better to adopt and just do our best?
Anonymous

yoisthisracist:

Just adopt and do your best.

Also find ways to include them in their culture through community groups etc. It is really disappointing growing up in a white household that completely ignores teaching you about your cultural roots.

micdotcom:

Fans are taking ‘Where’s Gamora?’ into their own hands

As many frustrated fans have pointed out online, much of the official Guardians of the Galaxy merchandise leaves out Gamora, one of the movie’s five titular Guardians, played by Zoe Saldana. Though Gamora has an equal amount of screen time as her male colleagues, and Saldana is second-billed after Chris Pratt, Gamora is mysteriously absent in some egregious ways.

Unfortunately, this is nothing new